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Technologies that shaped Internet, Web Development company

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Technologies that shaped Internet
Feb 18 2016

    It was the invention of telegraph, radio, telephone, television and computer that set the stage for invention of internet and dynamic web development systems. These technologies were the essential steps that helped give birth to a new technology called "INTERNET". Electricity and its application are the basic building blocks of all these technologies. At the heart of these technologies lies the basic human need of long distance communication and digitization. This article will discuss the various technological inventions that set the stage for internet and how they impacted its invention. This would help us better understand the complexities and possibilities of the internet ecosystem, a technological ecosystem that is unique, vast and very dynamic.

     

    The Telegraph

    Much before the innovation of telegraph, people had recognized a strong need for instant communication over long distances. The idea of an electronic telegraph had originated in 1700s but it was not until 1830s after the Morse Code was developed, that the modern electronic telegraph could be developed. The Morse code assigned letters in the alphabet and numbers a set of dots (short marks) and dashes (long marks) based on the frequency of use. The telegraph used the mechanism of electricity and magnetism over a long distance connection of electrical wires. At one end of the electronic telegraph were magnetic needles that deflected based on the codes of electric current generated from the other end of the telegraph. This breakthrough led to the invention of transmission and reception of electrical signals through wires between stations that were distance apart. It gave a strong foundation to distance communication revolution which later led to more distance communication innovations like Telephone, Fax and Internet.

     

    Telephone, Television and Radio

    In 1874 Graham Bell designed the idea of a telephone. He later explained it as, “If I could make a current of electricity vary in intensity precisely as the air varies in density during the production of sound, I should be able to transmit speech telegraphically.”  On March 10, 1876 the first famous sentence “Mr. Watson, come here; I want you” was transmitted in his laboratory. After the innovation of telephone, many science fiction writers were of the view that light can also pass through wires just as sound. After years of hard work by many scientists, it was in 1920’s that first ever televised images of moving objects, human faces and real time moving entities was transmitted.

     

    Computers and Integrated Circuits

    A computer is a general purpose device that can be programmed to carry out a set of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. The invention of vacuum tubes, transistors, integrated circuits and silicon computer chips paved path for electronic computers. Covered with endless cables, hundreds of blinking lights, nearly 6000 switches and around 18,000 vacuum tubes that carried electrical signals from one part of the machine to another, ENIAC was the first vacuum tube computer used by the U.S. military during World War II for ballistics calculations. Later invention of integrated circuits led to the rapid growth of personal desktop computers.

     

    Wondering how it all connects to the birth of Internet?

    The invention of telegraph led to the reception of electrical signals over long distances, which formed the first building block of long distance communication. This further laid grounds for transfer of voice and images signals in Telephones and Televisions. On the other end integrated circuit technologies led to the growth of computing technologies. However up until this time reception and communication of binary data over long distance communication networks was not possible. In 1961, Leonard Kleinrock convinced Lawrence G. Roberts, a MIT researcher that communication using packets instead of circuits was feasible and that the circuit switched telephone system was totally inadequate for the job. The next stepping stone was the ability of computers to talk together. In 1965 Roberts and Thomas Merill connected a computer TX-2 in Massachuesetts to a Q-32 computer in California.  By 1969 The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) had connected 4 host computers together and the Internet was officially launched. Powered with packet switching technology the basic technologies of Telegraph, Telephone, Television, Radio and Computers led to birth of Internet and Web Development.

    About Hammock Web: Hammock Web is a leading web development company that specializes in creating websites and web applications for all purposes. With extensive experience in web development our experts will develop any web application with perfection and in least possible time.


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